NEWSROOM

What you need to know about novel coronavirus (COVID-19)


Feb 262020 | Sinai Health Foundation

Ontario has only had a few confirmed cases of novel coronavirus (COVID-19) but the amount of media on the topic would suggest we should be worried.  Can you provide some perspective?
As this is a new virus, it takes some time for scientists to learn about the symptoms it causes and how it spreads. It’s understandable for people to experience worry in a situation like this where we don’t have all these answers right away.
However, public health experts continue to advise that at this time the risk in Canada remains low. It’s also important for people to know that health care providers are well prepared to deal with this situation and are now taking additional precautions.  For example, hospitals already have screening in place for respiratory illnesses such as influenza. Additional measures have been added to quickly and safely screen, isolate and test patients as recommended in guidance documents provided by the Ministry of Health in Ontario.
What can I do to protect myself and my family from getting novel coronavirus (COVID-19)?
Coronaviruses spread from person to person in tiny droplets of moisture expelled when someone who is infected coughs or sneezes. The best way to protect ourselves and others is with the same steps that help prevent the spread of colds or influenza:
  • Clean your hands often either with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or use alcohol-based hand rub.
  • Avoid touching your face.
  • Cough or sneeze into a tissue or your elbow and clean your hands after.
  • Stay home from work or school if you are feeling ill to avoid spreading infection to others.
Should I avoid travelling altogether, or only to certain countries?
For the latest travel advisories, visit the Government of Canada’s websiteto help inform any decisions about travel.

Read Full Article


ministry of health memo on coronavirus

Jan 10 2020


Read Memo


BEST WISHES TO GLEN BURKE

Another AT with Cardiac Surgery

 December 23 2019

The OATA and its Board of Directors extend their most sincere wishes for a speedy recovery to Glenn Burke, R. Kin, CAT(C), BACS (Sport Opt), SIM, who had coronary bypass surgery last week (December 20, 2019).


Glenn is the owner of Burke Athletic Therapy in Beamsville, Ontario.  He graduated from University College of Cape Breton were he obtained a BACS, PE/Biology in 1997.  After his move to Ontario, he completed a Sport Injury Manager diplomat at Sheridan College in 2001.
Glenn is a member of the CATA Ethics Committee.
He joins Drew Laskoski on the cardiac recovery team. All of us wish them a good 2020.


OATA made a submission to the Subcommittee on Sports-Related Concussions in Canada

MAY 2019




View the Submission


HAWAII GOES ALL-IN ON HEALING CONCUSSIONS: ATHLETIC TRAINERS PLACED IN EVERY HIGH SCHOOL

Feb 2019

"In Hawaii, the presence of athletic trainers is a given — they are considered an essential part of any school’s athletic program and play a key role in preventing concussions and helping those student athletes who do suffer concussions recover and return to both the playing field and the classroom."

Read The Article

the oata at the Ottawa Carleton ETFO/FEEO PD

 April 12 2019

The OATA was present at the Ottawa Carleton ETFO/FEEO Publishers Display Day on Friday, April 12, 2019 in Ottawa. The team of OATA members spoke to elementary school teachers about the benefits of Athletic Therapy.

Thanks to members Vanessa Harrington, Kirsten Kidd, Kathleen DeJesus-Gauthier, Chris Nelson and special thanks to District 3 leader Megan Stewart for organizing the showcase.


ONTARIO JUNIOR HOCKEY LEAGUE TRAINER OF THE YEAR AWARD WINNER AMANDA GILROY (CAT(C))

MARCH 2019

Congratulations to District 3 co-leader Amanda Gilroy for receiving the 2018-2019 Trainer of the Year award in the Ontario Junior Hockey League (OJHL)!

Check out her great interview where she talks about her passion for the AT Profession.


'We have a concussion problem' in Canada: Ken Dryden

By John Kryk for The Toronto SUN


Big bad Soviets? Broadstreet Bullies? Boston Bruins?

Throughout the 1970s Ken Dryden famously protected Team Canada and Montreal Canadiens nets from those imposing threats.

Now he’s on a mission to fight a far more serious threat – on behalf of young Canadian athletes in all sports, at all levels.

That is, concussions.

The Hockey Hall of Fame goaltender and former Liberal cabinet minister on Wednesday will tell a parliamentary subcommittee studying sports-related concussions in Canada that the problem is no longer awareness.

Rather, per a copy of his planned remarks obtained by Postmedia, Dryden will tell the subcommittee that there “is plenty of awareness. The problem is sports decision-makers who don’t take this awareness, and act.

“We have a problem … A knee that limps is one thing. A brain that limps is another.”


Click Here to Read Full Article 

IN MEMORIAM


JARED WILLIAM POSTANCE

1975 - 2018






Click HERE to view Gordon's Hall of Fame Biography of his enduring service to the profession of Athletic Therapy.





CONTACT US  

ONTARIO ATHLETIC THERAPIST ASSOCIATION

Copyright © 2020 (OATA) Ontario Athletic TherapistAssociation

60 Columbia Way, Suite 280

Markham, ON 

L3R 0C9


Tel: (905) 946-8080 | Fax: (905) 946-1517

 Telephone Support Hours: Monday - Friday 

8:30 am to 5:30 pm.

E-mail: info@ontarioathletictherapists.com

Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software